Episode 14:

fashion podcast

Ask Us Anything

You asked, and we answered!
A huge thank you to all of our lovely listeners who sent in questions, we absolutely loved hearing from you! The questions range from freelance life, to recognition in the industry and also include things like the technical aspects of pattern making and what we personally like to sew. 

fashion podcast

Questions:

  1. As pattern cutters, how much influence do you have on the designs in terms of both style and fabric choice?
  2. Do you sew for yourselves – and do you use commercial patterns or just self-drafted garments? What do you enjoy sewing most?
  3. Do you prefer using blocks as a basis for design or draping – and why?
  4. How do Freelance pattern cutters find more clients and work?
  5. What should a pattern cutters portfolio look like?
  6. After I make a block, how do I use it as a tool to get patterns I own to fit better? Is it possible to use the block as a fitting guide and would I transfer elements of the pattern to the block or vice versa?
  7. What are some easy things to do with blocks once they’re made? I really would like some successful projects and don’t want to over reach myself but I don’t need a bodice top or pencil skirt these days. 
  8. What advice would you give a graduate in fashion design who wants to find a job or internship in pattern cutting? I really want to learn more and build on my skills as well as confidence, but I’m not quite sure where to go. Especially during this time.
  9. I was wondering what your opinion was, on the recognition that people get when it comes to fashion. Usually 100s of people work on a collection, from pattern cutters to machinists, but it is the designer (who probably spent the least amount of time compared to everyone else on the collection) that gets all the credit. Designers like Pierre Paolo are changing that. How do you feel about it? And if you wanted more credit, what do you think could be an effective way of getting that done?
  10. Do Europeans have a different method of pattern cutting? I have heard of a french method called the moulage.
  11. How did you each come up with the names/logos for your businesses? I’m a pattern cutter and am planning to set up a professional Instagram page, but am struggling to come up with a name! I don’t want to use my own name as I’d use that for if I had my own brand in the future.
  12. Pricing! Most people in the fashion industry are so secretive about rates! How much would you recommend newer pattern cutters (of about a years experience) set their rates at for both manual and digital patterns? Is by the hour or per pattern better pricing?
  13. What process/book do you use for your made to measure garments and making blocks from scratch and are you at the stage in your career now where you can make blocks from memory, or do you still have to refer back to a book or your notes each time?

Some notes from our Answers!

Kathryn mentioned one of her students recent projects, the student was @chloemademe and this is her gorgeous skirt!


We also spoke about a couple of books, our standard favourites of course!

Metric Pattern Cutting by Winifred Aldrich
Pattern Making for Fashion Design by Helen Joseph-Armstrong


Caroline mentioned her online portfolio….go and have a little nosy at her amazing work here!


Is there a topic you’d like us to cover? We’d love to hear from you! Contact Kathryn and Caroline directly with any comments / feedback on fashionhalfcut@gmail.com. Alternatively you can reach out on instagram @fashionhalfcut.

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